2011-04-02

Hitting “Stryde” in your early career, part 4

Drake Editorial Team

A 5-Part Series on ‘Managing the Boss’

 

Part 4: Be Transparent About Your Ambitions (Shortcut # 46)

Excerpt from Hitting Stryde: An Early Career Survival Guide by Daneal Charney and David James Singh Want to read the other parts first?

This helps your boss look for opportunities to give you new experiences while you are doing the same. Never think it is your boss’s job to manage your career. In fact, remember that no one cares more about your career than you. Don’t wait for opportunities; go make them. Talk to your boss, or other senior people in the organization, about your career development path. Get to know their assistants and leverage them to get some face time. We guarantee that if you ask for just 20 minutes of even the busiest person’s schedule they’ll give you 30, if you frame it as a request for their guidance on your career. Set time to review your long- and short-term goals, aspirations and motivations. Once a date is set, confirm you are on the boss’s calendar. After the meeting, follow-up on any recommended actions and send the person a thank-you note. Want more career shortcuts, get them here.

 

For Part 5 of the “Managing the Boss” series, check back here in a few days!  Or, click here to subscribe so you’ll be sure not to miss it!

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