2014-09-09

Five mistakes managers make when building their team

Gregg Gregory

No surprise here — we all make mistakes. Many earn their initial management jobs simply by doing well in their follower position. Let me ask: How does doing a job well translate into leading others to do the same job? A person’s expertise at their job does not necessarily translate into them being a good manager capable of developing others.


Promoting a new manager without providing them with the interpersonal skills and training necessary to effectively promote a culture of teamwork is a disservice to both the individual and the team. Great managers have been taught that everyone is different and they understand how to develop, delegate, and motivate each individual within the team.


So, consider these mistakes managers make and see if any of these have ever happened to you.


1. Hiring the ‘Mini Me’. Too frequently, managers look to hire people that they get along with and the result is hiring people with the same personality style as they have. While they might get along with each other, the quality of the work and the team suffer.
2. Hiring Employees Based on Skill Sets Alone. Great teams are built from great team chemistry, and just because someone possesses the skills to do the job does not mean they will fit into the culture of the existing team. When a position opens up, look for a minimum skill set required and then hire based on the applicant’s attitude and how they will blend in with the existing players.
3. Underestimating the Power of the People. This is not just a mistake made by new managers; this mistake is carried out throughout many careers. Time and again, there is more emphasis placed on completing the task and getting the job done when, in fact, if more time was spent on developing the people the job would get done better, faster and with greater energy.
4. Resting on Their Laurels. Many mangers think that once they have reached a management role the days of their personal development is over. Nothing could be further from the truth. Top managers take more education the higher they rise within an organization; and the never think they know it all.
5. Failing to Give Credit Where Credit is Due. While many do not blatantly take personal credit for a team member’s ideas or successes, some managers fail to provide the individual or team with appropriate credit. This can result in the erosion of trust within the team.


What has your experience been? Have you had to overcome any of these situations?


Gregg Gregory, CSP, of Teams Rock, works with organizations helping them create a winning culture through teamwork. His interactive workshops and consulting helps clients achieve greater productivity, team morale and a positive organizational culture. His experience includes more than two decades of human resources, real estate, mortgage banking, as well as radio and television broadcasting. To learn more, please contact Gregg in the US via his web site www.TeamsRock.com

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